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“Best Of” tools for Job Seekers

Learning about related or tangent careers is something most job seekers struggle with.  Whether it is re-naming what you use as a job title or drastically changing careers, learning the new terminology can be a challenge.

Before you can move forward with your search, you have to figure out what you want to do and give it a name.  Hopefully this will be the most accurate name/title.  This can be difficult because companies use different job titles. 

One of the easier ways to find out related job titles is to go to O*Net.  

From this main page, select Browse under FIND OCCUPATIONS and type in your old job title.  

This will provide you with a Summary Report listing: similar job titles, tasks/job description, tools and technology, skills, education, wages and trends, related occupations, etc.  

With a little playing around you can begin exploring more related occupations and learn about their requirements. 

People, job seekers, ask a lot, "I want to know what jobs are in demand or fore-casted to be in demand".  Actually, that isn't really how they phrase it.  They ask:  "I want to find a job that is secure, where would I find it?" 

Occupational Outlook Quarterly does a thorough job explaining where industries are headed and what occupations will be needed. 

Last, but not least, the Department of Labor has released its survey results of tools people feel to be most helpful.  They all appear on Job Seeker Tools.  

Personally, I wouldn't consider job boards a tool right now, but…

Under the heading of CAREER EXPLORATION TOOLS, there seems to be some resources that might assist with exploring new jobs that are a match for your interest, skills and abilities.  

Once you have begun to create a list of titles that interest you, start asking people what they think and who they know. (These can be called networking meetings or informational meetings, by the way). In speaking with people really doing the job, you will learn whether this might be the right direction for you, or not.  No investment in this process is a waste of time.  Think about what you've learned and who you've met as you've gone through the process. 

Comments on this entry are closed.

  • Career Colleges February 10, 2010, 11:31 pm

    Thanks for these tips. I might need this in the future.

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